FEDIA.net

I’ve been meaning to write this for a while and pondering how to deal with communications overload. Finally, inspired by Danica Radovanovic’s Communications Protocol ,I’ve created my own. 

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Email 

If you want to share information, make a specific request - email’s your beast. Want a conversation or to bat ideas back and forth? - let’s both avoid RSI and hop on a call - or if it’s something where there are lots of questions for me to answer, but other people are going to need to benefit from the answers - put them in a shared doc, like an etherpad or GDoc - we can comment there and share with the relevant people to make it a bit more permanent. 

I have vowed to check emails once per day, which means that you’ll probably not get a response within 24 hours - so not your ideal mechanism if you need a speedy response. I don’t check emails sent after 6pm in whichever timezone I am currently working, so they will be picked up the next day. I don’t check work emails at the weekend - so see below if you need to contact me. 

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Instant messaging (e.g. grove, IRC)

I aspire to spend more time talking to people directly in chats to help them when they need it. I’ll need people’s help to reduce email volume to make that easier though! 

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Twitter 

I love twitter! Sharing something you just want me to see at my leisure. I dream of a day, when like @pschemedia - it can be my main mode of communication. I get DMs on my phone like text messages, so if you’re trying to get hold of me when I’m not checking email. I have no problem with emergency tweets from work colleagues even at weekends (Note: Emergency >= “the site we are due to launch on Monday just got taken over by internet pirates”, or “I’m stuck in Bogota and my bag just got stolen, can you buy me a new flight, pretty please!”). 

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SMS & Phone 

I’m a bit of a phone disaster and spend lots of time in situations where I can’t have volume on, don’t recommend relying on this one. 

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SKYPE.

I have office hours from 2-3pm CE(S)T each day. These are for anyone to drop into - irrespective of whether I work with them or not. I also love talking about projects that I am not directly involved in at this point, so if you want my input, but aren’t in my team - this is your chance! 

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Face-to-Face communication 

That’s radical. By far my favourite communication mechanism. 

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Paper letters 

I read everything that I receive in paper form. If it’s handwritten, you can guarantee I’ll hang on each word - so the optimum form of communication if you want my undivided attention. 

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Google plus, Facebook, and Linkedin 

Google plus is an OK medium for work things, but the filtering mechanism of Gmail means it doesn’t go into my primary email, so I won’t see it so often. I try and keep Facebook for fun updates. Notifications from Linkedin are disabled - as I found them incredibly annoying - so you could be waiting for a long time for an answer there. 

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Trello and GDocs 

I guess not traditionally thought of as communications mechanisms, but if you ping me there with a direct @/+ notification, I’ll get it and should be able to respond in your doc / plan directly where you need it. 

Mar 27
Communications Protocol
#DDJBook started to inspire aspiring data journalists to treat data as a source, dig deep into it and rehash it to find stories and present it in ever more exciting ways for an increasingly demanding audience. The Handbook started at Mozilla Festival in 2011, when we managed to convince a group of the world’s leading data journalists to lock themselves in a room for two days, 8 months later, the book was launched at the International Journalism Festival in Perugia… 
Together with Liliana Bounegru and Jonathan Gray, I edited and contributed to the book. 
Jan 19

#DDJBook started to inspire aspiring data journalists to treat data as a source, dig deep into it and rehash it to find stories and present it in ever more exciting ways for an increasingly demanding audience. The Handbook started at Mozilla Festival in 2011, when we managed to convince a group of the world’s leading data journalists to lock themselves in a room for two days, 8 months later, the book was launched at the International Journalism Festival in Perugia… 

Together with Liliana Bounegru and Jonathan Gray, I edited and contributed to the book. 

The Technology for Transparent and Accountable Public Finance report was written for a GIFT meeting in Brazil 2012. It showcases some of the most groundbreaking initiatives from both civil society and governments in using technology to further fiscal transparency around the world in 2012. 
Jan 19

The Technology for Transparent and Accountable Public Finance report was written for a GIFT meeting in Brazil 2012. It showcases some of the most groundbreaking initiatives from both civil society and governments in using technology to further fiscal transparency around the world in 2012.